Eastern Woodlands Culture

The Eastern Woodland Indians - Their life and culture

native-net.org/tribes/eastern-woodland-indians.html

Before the invasion of the Europeans on Indian territories the Eastern Woodland Indians were made up of several different tribes that lived in the northeastern United States. Living in thick wooded areas the Eastern Woodland territory spanned from the Atlantic Ocean to further west than the Great Lakes and from into Canada to as far south as Florida. Although their beliefs, ideas, and ways of thinking were vastly different the Eastern Woodland Indians lived in similar fashions with complex societies that were divide…

Eastern Woodlands Culture Area

Indians 101: The Eastern Woodlands Culture Area

dailykos.com/stories/2019/1/17/1826911/-Indians-101-The-Eastern-Woodlands-Culture-Area

Jan 17, 2019 · The map shown above shows the primary North American Indian culture areas. According to the display in the Maryhill Museum of Art: “The Woodlands occupy the entire eastern

Woodland cultures | ancient North American Indian cultures ...

britannica.com/topic/Woodland-cultures

Woodland cultures, prehistoric cultures of eastern North America dating from the 1st millennium bc. A variant of the Woodland tradition was found on the Great Plains. Over most of this area these cultures were replaced by the Mississippian culture ( q.v.) in the 1st millennium ad, but in some regions they survived until historic times.

Welcome to the Eastern Woodlands religion/culture section

nativeamericanstthomas.weebly.com/culture-and-religion3.html

The Eastern Woodland Culture consisted of Indian tribes inhabiting the eastern United States and Canada. The Eastern Woodlands were moderate-climate regions roughly from the Atlantic to the Mississippi River and included the Great Lakes. This huge area boasted ample rainfall, numerous lakes and rivers, and great forests.

Eastern Woodlands Indigenous Peoples in Canada | The ...

thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/aboriginal-people-eastern-woodlands

Eastern Woodlands Indigenous peoples belong to two unrelated language families, Iroquoian and Algonquian. It is important to note that while Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) peoples form part of the Iroquoian language group, they do not comprise the entirety of the group. The same is true for the Algonquin and the Algonquian language group. Iroquoian-speaking peoples in this area include the Erie (south of Lake Erie), Neutral (Grand River–Niagara River area), Wenro (east of Niagara River), Haudenos…

Woodland Indians

warpaths2peacepipes.com/native-american-indians/woodland-indians.htm

Woodland Indians - Culture The climate and natural resources that were available resulted in the adoption of the culture shared by the Woodland Indians. This section on the Woodland Indians group provides facts and information about their languages, the Geography and Environment which featured inland rivers, streams and lakes.

Eastern Woodlands Culture 5th Grade

woodland2 - Germantown Elementary School

germantownbulldogs.org/pages/Indian%20Project/woodland2.html

The Indians in the Eastern Woodland Culture lived east of the Plains Indians. These Indians, like the Indians of the other cultures depended on the natural resources around them for all of their basic needs. Because these Indians lived in the forests, they were called the Eastern Woodland Indians. Their food, shelter, clothing, weapons, and ...

Eastern Woodland Beliefs and Traditions - D'Abate Rooms ...

sites.google.com/site/205206aimuseum/exhibits/eastern-woodlands-beliefs-and-traditions

Wampum was used by tribes in the Eastern Woodland culture area as money and to record history. Wampum is still used for decoration and as jewelry. This painting by Peggy McGivern represents a Green Corn Ceremony. The Green Corn Ceremony is a celebration and religious ceremony to give thanks for the sun, rain, corn and a good harvest.

Eastern Woodlands Culture